Hard Femme #2 – Skirt CyclistHard Femme #2 – Ciclista en Falda

Here’s a little something I wrote a few months ago for the second edition of Kirsty Fife’s Hard Femme zine. You still need to get it because it’s full of compelling musings about her life as a broke, queer, fat, tough and feminine chick.

Copies of Hard Femme 2, available for sale. Photo: Kirsty Fife.
Copies of Hard Femme 2, available for sale. Photo: Kirsty Fife.

Skirt Cyclist
by Cynthia Rodríguez

You know how, once the clock and the calendar tell us it’s time to start afresh, people make ridiculously impossible or painful resolutions? Not spending a pound, losing a large amount of pounds, and end up spending a large amount of pounds and not losing a pound. Well, this year, I had a very clear resolution and I wasn’t going to rest until I accomplished it in 2013, 2014 or 2134: LEARNING HOW TO RIDE A BICYCLE.

hardfemme2-selfiehelmet

Let’s jump back in time, shall we? Around the early 90s, you were all probably having bike adventures (bikeventures?) with your friends around the block, or enjoying exquisite holidays exploring the countryside away from your parents, or coming back from school with your gang on your two-wheeled beauties. Well, I wasn’t. I was clumsy, hyperactive, a chubby daydreamer. Because of this, my parents never let me ride a bicycle. When I was four years old, I won a nice mountain bike at the city’s most popular children’s TV show. It just rusted away in the laundry for twenty years until we had to bin it. I wasn’t made for it. My feet were made of butter, and my belly was in the way of my mere right to exist. So I wasn’t allowed to go on a bicycle or else I’d have an accident. Yet, somehow, my parents thought step aerobics were a perfect source of safe and clean fun for a primary school kid. Until I broke my ankle. Then, I had the word ‘CLUMSY’ tatooed on my forehead. That was it. Bye.

Driving, yes. Cycling, no.
Driving, yes. Cycling, no.

Later, I moved to Britain and noticed how everyone and their mums were commuting on their bicycles. Clumsy fat everyone and their clumsy fat mums on bikes. Bros wearing the whole gear, hairy librarians, high femmes on high heels, potheads, nans, children. And they flew like angels, defeating traffic and conglomerations, fast, free and – YES! – safe from harm. I wanted to be like them. I had to be like them. My butter feet were melting for them. My protuberant belly was jumping up and down with butterflies (or any non-Illuminati insect of your preference, say, bumblebees?) dancing inside. I had to do this. The time was now.

hardfemme2-ilovemybike

So, in 2013, I enquired about bicycle lessons. My city has a programme that offers free lessons to citizens of all ages and sizes. I joined one of those around March. It was a big group comprised of absolute beginners. Some of them, my mum’s age. Most of them, Women of Colour like me – although I’m Latina and many of them were Hindu and Gujarati. Yes, many of us were big and clumsy too! It was great to know I wasn’t the only one in the entire universe. But we got there. Together, we got there.

Sweep says...
Sweep says…

Our teachers were the Queens of Awesome. One of them, Maryam Amatullah, is the Local Cycling Hero in the entire Midlands. Not just Leicester, but including Birmingham, Worcester, Coventry, Derby and – our very own Shelbyville – Nottingham. She’s married with children, a hijabi Muslim, and a superstar on two wheels. She was the one who pushed me when I had my first cycling ‘steps’, and recorded me on video so I could flaunt it to my family. The other one, Priya Mistry, is one of my fashion and lifestyle rolemodels. A mix between M.I.A. and Haruko Haruhara from FLCL, bright orange hair, the most colourful outfits, and a very Mr. Miyagi approach to teaching. Thanks to her HARD unorthodox method, I can signal left and right. Also, if my stalking isn’t wrong (well, she used to stalk me on the way home to see if I was doing what I learned!), she’s also an actress and contemporary dancer. Queens, I tell you.

Still of the time I learned to ride. From a video by Maryam Amatullah.
Still of the time I learned to ride. From a video by Maryam Amatullah.

Within twelve weeks, not only did I learn how to ride a bicycle from scratch, but I could ride around the park, the neighbourhood, and across the city in roundabouts and rammed roads. Now I live and breathe cycling. I read books on the subject, get the occassional magazine, ogle at bike shops and keep wishlists on eBay and Amazon. I felt so much joy reading zines such as Hard Femme Bike Tour by Elokin and Pamela and On Being Hard Femme by Jackie Wang, knowing I was not alone in my obsession with cycling as a femme weirdo.

Do I wear leotards? Heck, no. Priya hates me for this, but I love cycling while wearing skirts. Mini-skirts, mid-skirts, dresses, floaty skirts, pencil skirts. I love it. It’s a really empowering way to assert my hard femme identity. I can like cute things AND tough things. I’m Barbie AND G.I. Jane. I’m fine getting dirty and still looking pretty. I can fall on shrubberies, on the road, flat on the handlebars, sideways, on my backpack like a turtle, and – the greatest discovery in my clumsy lifetime – stand up, get on the wheel and continue.

hardfemme2-gloves

To be a skirt cyclist you need to be safe, of course. Get a skirt guard for your back wheel. Make your own with a mosquito net and some ribbons or something. If you rent bikes in London, they come already with a skirt guard because they know how sophisticated and/or whimsical you are. Or install a rack on your back wheel, clip a panier bag to and rock on, like I do. Not just safe for my frocks, but good for grocery shopping. Leggins are good if you want to prevent exposure and chub rub. Or wear bike shorts and cream. If you want to, go full blown Queen’s “Bicycle Race”.

If I can’t wear a skirt or I just feel like wearing trousers, I wear red lipstick. To keep the hard femme alive and for a bit of confidence. I want to reach a point where I’m aware that hard femme is in the heart and that I can look like a dog’s dinner and still feel safe and free. Maybe that will be my new year’s resolution for 2014? To embrace ugly cycling?

    Now I love cycling so much, Natalie Perkins drew me in my gear. Skirt included.
Now I love cycling so much, Natalie Perkins drew me in my gear. Skirt included.

May you have a wonderful 2014 and may your beautiful resolutions come true!Aquí hay algo que escribí hace pocos meses para la segunda edición del zine Hard Femme de Kirsty Fife. De todos modos tienen que conseguirlo porque está repleto de convincentes cavilaciones sobre su vida como una chica sin dinero, queer, ruda y femenina.

Copies of Hard Femme 2, available for sale. Photo: Kirsty Fife.
Copias de Hard Femme 2, disponibles a la venta. Foto: Kirsty Fife.

Ciclista en Falda
por Cynthia Rodríguez

¿Ustedes saben cómo, una vez que el reloj y el calendario nos dicen que es tiempo de comenzar desde cero, la gente hace propósitos ridículamente imposibles o dolorosos? No gastar un peso, bajar mucho de peso, y terminar gastando muchos pesos y no bajando de peso. Bueno, este año, tuve un propósito muy claro y no iba a descansar sin cumplirlo en el 2013, 2014 o 2134: APRENDER A ANDAR EN BICICLETA.

hardfemme2-selfiehelmet

Demos un salto atrás en el tiempo, ¿no? Por ahí de principios de los 90s, todos ustedes probablemente estaban teniendo aventuras en bici (¿biciaventuras?) con sus amigos de la cuadra, o disfrutando exquisitas vacaciones explorando el campo lejos de sus padres, o regresando de la escuela con su palomilla en sus chuladas de dos ruedas. Bueno, yo no. Era torpe, hiperactiva, una gordita soñadora. Por esto, mis padres nunca me dejaron andar en bici. Cuando tenía cuatro años, me gané una linda bicicleta de montaña en el show infantil de televisión más importante de la ciudad. Nada más se oxidó en la lavandería por veinte años hasta que tuvimos que tirarla a la basura. Yo no estaba hecha para ella. Mis pies eran de mantequilla, y mi barriga estaba en el camino de mi mero derecho a existir. Así que no tuve permitido andar en bicicleta o tendría un accidente. Como quiera, de algun modo, mis padres pensaron que los aerobics de step serían una fuente perfecta de diversión sana y limpia para una niña de primaria. Hasta que me rompí el tobillo. Entonces, tuve la palabra ‘TORPE’ tatuada en la frente. Ahí acabó todo. Adiós.

Manejar, sí. Andar en bici, no.
Manejar, sí. Andar en bici, no.

Más tarde, me mudé a Gran Bretaña y me di cuenta de cómo todos y sus madres se transportaban en sus bicicletas. Todos los torpes y gordos y todas sus madres torpes y gordas en bicis. Batos portando todo el equipo, bibliotecarios peludos, altas féminas en tacones altos, pachecos, abuelitas, niños. Y volaban como los ángeles, derrotando al tráfico y las conglomeraciones, rápidos, libres y – ¡SÍ! – a salvo de cualquier daño. Quería ser como ellos. Tenía que ser como ellos. Mis pies de mantequilla se derretían por ellos. Mi barriga protuberante brincaba de arriba a abajo con mariposas (o cualquier otro insecto no Illuminati de su preferencia, digamos, ¿abejorros?) bailando dentro. Tenía que hacer esto. El momento era ahora.
hardfemme2-ilovemybike

Así que, en el 2013, pregunté por cursos de ciclismo. Mi ciudad tiene un programa que ofrece lecciones gratis para ciudadanos de todas las edades y tamaños. Me uní a uno de ellos por ahí de marzo. Era un gran grupo conformado de principiantes absolutos. Algunos de ellos, de la edad de mi mamá. La mayoría de ellos, mujeres de color como yo – aunque yo soy latina y muchas de ellas eran hindi y gujarati. ¡Sí, muchos de nosotros eramos grandes y torpes también! Fue genial saber que yo no era la única así en el universo entero. Pero allá llegamos. Juntas, allá llegamos.

Sweep dice...
Sweep dice…

Nuestras maestras eran las Reinas de la Genialidad. Una de ellas, Maryam Amatullah, es la Héroe Local del Ciclismo en todo el centro de Inglaterra. No sólo Leicester, sino incluyendo a Birmingham, Worcester, Coventry, Derby y – nuestro propio Shelbyville – Nottingham. Casada y con hijos, musulmana con hijab, y una superestrella en dos ruedas. Fue ella quien me empujó cuando di mis primeros ‘pasos’ en bici, y me grabó en video para presumirle a mi familia. La otra, Priya Mistry, es una de mis modelos a seguir en cuanto a moda y estilo de vida. Una mezcla entre M.I.A. y Haruko Haruhara de FLCL, cabello naranja brillante, los atuendos más coloridos, y una manera muy Señor Miyagi de educar. Gracias a su método DURO y no ortodoxo, puedo señalar a la izquierda y a la derecha. Además, si mi espionaje no se esquivoca (¡bueno, ella solía seguirme a escondidas en el camino a casa para ver si estaba haciendo lo que había aprendido!), también es actriz y bailarina contemporánea. Reinas, les digo.

Fragmento de la vez en que aprendí a andar en bici. De un video de Maryam Amatullah.
Fragmento de la vez en que aprendí a andar en bici. De un video de Maryam Amatullah.

En doce semanas, no sólo aprendí a andar en bicicleta desde cero, sino pude andar por el parque, el vecindario, y hasta el otro lado de la ciudad en rotondas y callas conglomeradas. Ahora vivo y respiro ciclismo. Leo libros sobre el tema, compro revistas ocasionalmente, babeo en tiendas de bicis y tengo listas en eBay y Amazon. Sentí tanto gusto leyendo zines como Hard Femme Bike Tour de Elokin y Pamela y On Being Hard Femme de Jackie Wang, sabiendo que no estaba sola en mi obsesión con el ciclismo como una rarita afeminada.

¿Que si uso leotardos? Claro que no. Priya me odia por esto, pero amo andar de ciclista mientras visto faldas. Minifaldas, midifaldas, vestidos, faldas esponjosas, faldas lápiz. Me encanta. Es una forma realmente empoderadora de afirmar mi identidad hard femme. Me pueden gustas las cosas bonitas Y rudas. Soy Barbie Y G.I. Jane. No tengo problemas ensuciándome y aún viéndome linda. Puedo caer en arbustos, en la calle, directo en los manubrios, de lado, de espaldas sobre mi mochila como tortuga, y – el mayor descubrimiento en toda mi torpe vida – levantarme, subirme al volante y continuar.

hardfemme2-gloves

Para ser ciclista en falda necesitas estar segura, por supuesto. Consigue un protector de faldas para tu rueda trasera. Haz el tuyo con una red de mosquito y algunos listones o algo. Si rentas bicis en Londres [o en la ciudad de México], ya vienen con protector de faldas porque saben que tan sofisticada y chiflada eres. O instala un portaequipajes en tu rueda trasera, abrocha una bolsa panera y a darle, como yo. No es sólo seguro para mis vestidos, sino que es bueno para el mandado. Los leggins son buenos si quieres prevenir exponerte o que se rocen tus muslos. O usa shorts y crema. Si quieres, vete como en “Bicycle Race” de Queen.

Si no puedo usar falda o sólo siento que tengo ganas de andar en pantalones, uso labial rojo. Para mantener viva a la hard femme y para un poco de confianza en mí misma. Quiero llegar a un punto en el que esté segura que ser hard femme está en el corazón y que puedo parecer comida para perros y como quiera sentirme segura y libre. ¿Quizás ese sea mi propósito de año nuevo para el 2014? ¿Abrazar al ciclismo fodongo?

Ahora amo tanto andar en bici, que Natalie Perkins me dibujó con todo y mi equipo. Falda incluida.
Ahora amo tanto andar en bici, que Natalie Perkins me dibujó con todo y mi equipo. Falda incluida.

¡Que tengan un maravilloso 2014 y que sus hermosos propósitos se hagan realidad!

One thought on “Hard Femme #2 – Skirt CyclistHard Femme #2 – Ciclista en Falda

  1. Hi, I read your blog as research for our next “Global Bike Talk” podcast. I like your style. Let me know if you’d collaborate–maybe an audio blog?
    Or call-in on our topic for this month, “cycling as a human right.” You can listen to our last Global show at Biketalk.com.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s